Thursday, March 6, 2014


There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea ~ Henry James

What do you do when you read? No really? Where and what do you do while you read? My favorite place to read is on the couch in my living room in front of the fire. I like to read a book, drink hot tea or hot chocolate, and I usually play a movie I've seen before on the tv. (No, I cannot handle the silence and I'm not a music person at home.)There are some TV shows I can watch and read at the same time. I read through the boring parts and watch when it's interesting (thank goodness for the DVR and rewinding live television now).

I can read just about anywhere. I read waiting for the car to be serviced, waiting for church to start, waiting for meetings. I read while traveling and on vacations.

As a matter of fact, if I don't get some reading done for the day, I feel like something is missing. If I can't fall asleep, it's generally because I didn't get any reading done. Once I get into my book, my eyes become droopy and I'm able to sleep.

What do you like to do while reading?

 
 
 
Check out Dean's book, A Place To Call Their Own
 
 
A Place to Call Their Own
 
When the War Between the States ended in 1865 many Americans emerged from the turmoil energized by their possibilities for the future. Frank Greerson and Gregory Young were no different. After battling southern rebels and preserving the Union, the two men set out to battle the Kansas Prairie and build a life together. Frank yearned for his own farm, away from his family—even at the risk of alienating them. Gregory, an only child, returned home to claim his inheritance to help finance their adventure out west.
Between the difficult work of establishing a farm on the unforgiving Kansas prairie, and the additional obstacles provided by the weather, Native Americans and wild animals, will their love and loyalty be enough to sustain them through the hardships?

http://musapublishing.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=9&products_id=615


Author Bio: With inspiration from some historical tourism sites, the love of reading, and a desire to write a novel, L. Dean Pace-Frech started crafting his debut novel, A Place to Call Their Own, in 2008. After four years of writing and polishing the manuscript, he submitted it for publication and Musa Publishing offered him a contract in early 2013. 
Dean lives in Kansas City, Missouri with his partner, Thomas, and their two cats.  They are involved in their church and enjoy watching movies, outdoor activities in the warmer weather and spending time together with friends and family. In addition to writing, Dean enjoys reading and patio gardening.
Prior to novels, Dean did some technical writing in his career.  He has written another complete fiction manuscript and has a third manuscript outlined.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Fly Without the Plane

It is the greatest shot of adrenaline to be doing what you have wanted to do so badly. You almost feel like you could fly without the plane ~ Charles Lindbergh

January and February can be the coldest months of the year. I don't mind anymore, because I love staying in with a good book! (I don't usually complain about the heat in the summer for the same reason.)

I've always been an avid reader since I was young. Now, when  I read, I always try to find a writer's lesson in each book. The older I get the more moral lessons I glean from the pages.

My favorite books are usually historicals, hence the reason I write them. I grew up on the Little House books and graduated very quickly to John Jakes, Alex Haley, etc. as a teenager.

Now I like read about LGBT characters in historical settings. The community has enough issues today, can you imagine what it was like to live with a same sex spouse in the 1800s? The early 1900s?  That's what I like to read about these days.

Check out Erato's full line of LGBT novels. Whether you like historical, contemporary, or paranormal, Erato has something for you.

What are you reading this week?

When the War Between the States ended in 1865 many Americans emerged from the turmoil energized by their possibilities for the future. Frank Greerson and Gregory Young were no different. After battling southern rebels and preserving the Union, the two men set out to battle the Kansas Prairie and build a life together. Frank yearned for his own farm, away from his family—even at the risk of alienating them. Gregory, an only child, returned home to claim his inheritance to help finance their adventure out west.

Between the difficult work of establishing a farm on the unforgiving Kansas prairie, and the additional obstacles provided by the weather, Native Americans and wild animals, will their love and loyalty be enough to sustain them through the hardships?

With inspiration from some historical tourism sites, the love of reading, and a desire to write a novel, L. Dean Pace-Frech started crafting his debut novel, A Place to Call Their Own, in 2008. After four years of writing and polishing the manuscript, he submitted it for publication and Musa Publishing offered him a contract in early 2013. Disappear With Me is his second novel. 

Dean lives in Kansas City, Missouri with his partner, Thomas, and their two cats. They are involved in their church and enjoy watching movies, outdoor activities in the warmer weather and spending time together with friends and family. In addition to writing, Dean enjoys reading and patio gardening. 

Prior to novels, Dean did some technical writing in his career. He plans to write a sequel to both A Place to Call Their Own and Disappear with Me



Monday, December 2, 2013

Thank you for having me today! I am new author, L. Dean Pace-Frech, and my second novel, Disappear With Me, will be released on December 6.





In 2006, a co-worker shared with me that one of her bucket list goals was to write a novel. That comment awakened a desire in me that had been buried since I was in the fifth grade. After a visit to Pea Ridge National Military Park near Pea Ridge, Arkansas, my characters and their story revealed themselves to me and I started writing.

I have always loved history. I grew up reading the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  The Young Adult category didn't exist when I was growing up, so I graduated from those books and went on to read historical dramas like Roots, The Blue and the Gray, the Kent Family Chronicles, and the North and South Trilogy.  It's inevitable that I would write historical fiction.

Disappear With Me is the story of the search for love and acceptance. First of all, orphaned Reverend Leander Norris searches for self-worth and unconditional love. Once he discovers unconditional love, he gains the courage he needs to fight the accusations against him.

Although my characters are gay, the book is classified as LGBT fiction, and I am gay, my goal was to make the story universal.  Frank and Gregory could be any couple facing parental influences, natural disasters, or societal prejudices. 

My goal was never to create an allegorical story or political statement with my novel. I started out writing what I wanted to read:  historical fiction with strong LGBT characters.  With our current political climate and the issue of marriage equality, it's difficult to deny that there are some thematic elements that support equal rights.  I read in the mid-1990s that just being an out gay man at the time was a political statement.  I think it's hard to be an LGBT writer right now and avoid any thematic messages about marriage equality or other civil rights issues.

As a writer, I try to create stories that are interesting to different types of people.  If just one person who doesn't understand the fight for LGBT equal rights is persuaded by my novel to be open to those discussions, then I have done my job.

Thanks for having me.  You can join the discussion on social media using the hashtag #disappearwithme and I will join in.

Here’s a little more about Disappear with Me:

Love is greater than hope or faith, but can Reverend Leander Norris convince a jury that the love he shares with another man is natural?

In 1910, the United Kingdom was in turmoil. King Edward died after only nine years on the throne. The social class system that upheld British society for centuries was being chipped away by social, political, and economic unrest across the Commonwealth. Amidst this backdrop, Reverend Leander Norris is accused of sodomy. After discovering his own self-worth and unconditional love, Leander finds the courage to stand up for what he believes is right and pleads not guilty to the charges. Throughout the trial, Leander’s past is revealed, including the temptations that bring the accusations against him. By the end of the trail, Leander is once again reunited with a romantic interest from the past, but it may be too late to rekindle any love that might remain, given the circumstances of the era and Leander’s likely sentence.
Excerpt:
“Are you not a scholar?” Weeks asked. “Do you not know the Bible that you preach from each Sunday?”

“I know it very well,” Leander answered. “But the Bible has many interpretations. I think you can guess that mine might be a little less than conventional.”

Weeks reclined back in his chair. He made a steeple with his fingers and rested them on his pursed lips. 

“You’re actually sitting here telling me that, as a man of God, you’re all right with buggery and feel you’ve done nothing wrong?”

“Mr. Weeks, do you realize you keep asking me the same question over again, using different words?”

“As your counsel, I need to be sure that I understand your position, the one you expect me to defend.”

“You sound shocked that I would suggest such a thing. I can’t have you defending me if you don’t believe it yourself.”

“Reverend, my beliefs about the situation are irrelevant; it doesn’t matter what I believe. I need to be able to defend our position in court and hope our defense can refute what the prosecution will present.”

“I have to have conviction in my sermons each Sunday morning. I think you also know you need to have conviction when defending your clients.”

“And I can assure you that I have that same conviction to make sure that you receive a fair trial. I will do my best—”

“Do your best to what? Go through the motions and make sure that the I’s are dotted and the T’s are crossed so it looks like I’ve been given a good defense?”

Weeks didn’t answer and that was all the answer that Leander needed.

After a moment, Weeks tried to start again. “Look, Reverend, I am your assigned counsel for this trial. I am on your side. I want to see you get a fair trial, but you must understand what we’re up against is quite overwhelming.”

“I know; I’ve never done anything the simple way.”

 “Sir, you must understand that we are going up against laws that are rooted in two thousand years of Christian tradition and about as many years of British attitude.”

“Mr. Weeks, do you love your wife?”

Weeks let out an impatient sigh. “Of course, but here you go asking intimate questions about me that have no bearing on my defending your case.”

“Humor me, sir. Do you love your wife?”

“Yes, I very much love my wife and family.”

“What if you woke up tomorrow and a constable showed up on your doorstep and arrested you because they said the love you share with your wife was illegal?”

Weeks didn’t answer him. Instead, in a quiet voice, he said, “You know you and I are just two people. We’re not going to change these laws overnight.”

About the Author:

With inspiration from historical tourism sites, the love of reading, and a desire to write a novel, L. Dean Pace-Frech started crafting his debut novel, A Place to Call Their Own, in 2008. After four years of writing and polishing the manuscript, he submitted it for publication and Musa Publishing offered him a contract in early 2013. Disappear With Me is his second novel.
Dean lives in Kansas City, Missouri with his partner, Thomas, and their two cats. They are involved in their church and enjoy watching movies, outdoor activities in the warmer weather and spending time together with friends and family. In addition to writing, Dean enjoys reading and patio gardening.
Prior to novels, Dean did some technical writing in his career. He plans to write a sequel to both A Place to Call Their Own and Disappear with Me.

Thank you for stopping by today! Join the conversation:  use #disappearwithme to talk about the novel on social media. I love to connect!

Facebook:  Dean Pace-Frech, Author page or send me a friend request Dean Pace-Frech.
Twitter: @deanpacefrech
Google+: +deanpacefrech
Goodreads: L. Dean Pace-Frech
Pinterest:  Dean Pace-Frech

Check out Dean’s first book, A Place to Call Their Own, at Musa Publishing, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and other great sites!



Monday, August 5, 2013

Interview with Thomas Kearnes

Today, we welcome Thomas Kearnes to the Erato Blog. His book, Pretend I'm Not Here, is available for purchase now.

Tell us about yourself

I grew up in a very bigoted part of the country where not only was homosexuality widely despised but intellect was distrusted as well. My hometown is Whitehouse, Texas, which is just south of Tyler. Tyler is about 90 miles due east of Dallas and 90 miles due west of Shreveport, Louisiana. Growing up in such a backwards town, however, had its advantages. I still maintain close relationships with the friends I had as a child, and I learned to foster one hell of an imagination.

I just turned 37 years old last month. I’m still healing over a five-year relationship with a man named Mike that ended in 2010 with his unexpected death. My first serious relationship following that originated in a drug rehab and fared about as poorly as such relationships tend to fare. I’m taking things very slowly with the fellow now in my life. I’m simply acclimating myself to the huge, intimidating city of Houston and keeping busy. At the start of next year, I will be returning to school to become a social worker. My dream job is to work with other gay youth in Houston, specializing in HIV/AIDS and meth addiction counseling. (I, myself, had an eleven-year history with the drug.) I am an atheist and an Eagle Scout.

Tell us about your Book

“Pretend I’m Not Here” is a collection of 22 stories culled from the last decade of my published work. All the stories but one have published individually in online or print venues. While some published in venues catering to the GLBT audience exclusively, a good number also have found a general audience. I think these stories work for both queer and mainstream readers. I like to think of the collection of an exploration of numerous themes rarely illuminated in “gay fiction”—the hardships faced by gay men in rural settings, the often awkward interactions between gay men and their heterosexual loved ones, the misunderstood dynamics of the gay party subculture, and much more. It offers over 225 pages of fiction for only five dollars. Quite a deal!

Who is your favorite Hero/Heroine you have written?

In “What Pleases Him Most,” the fourth story in the collection, I introduce readers to a couple named Darren Young and Cutter Drake. Darren is a college student and Cutter is in his mid-30s. Their relationship involves copious crystal meth and frequent visits to the bathhouse where Cutter encourages Darren to act out the older man’s voyeuristic fantasies. I like to think the story proves that we can never know the inner dynamic of a romantic couple, be they gay or straight. I thought giving the couple an ending that is surprisingly sweet (especially after the ugliness they experience in the story) would be a welcome dose of optimism compared with the generally cynical tenor of most of the collection’s stories.

What are you working on now?

Several things, actually. Right now, I’m compiling a collection of my flash fiction for a chapbook named “Some of Them Want to Be Abused.” I expect to put it on the market shortly. Flash fiction is a category for stories that are under 1,000 words. It’s grown exponentially since the advent of online publishing.

As far as what I’m writing, I recently finished a revision of a fairly short work called “Red Alert” that depicts sisterly jealousy during an afterschool hair-dying session. I’m also working on the first draft of a story called “Impact” that explores what makes a woman who lost her family to a drunk driver relive her agony every month by telling her story to other DUI offenders. Finally, my next project is a story called “Simone” that depicts a clique of friends in a drug rehab that fractures following the sudden death of one of their own. A haunted soda machine plays a key role.

What’s your favorite movie?

Robert Altman’s “Nashville” is my favorite movie of all-time. It was released in 1975 and documents the campaign of a fictional presidential candidate and the music-industry types at the campaign’s fringe. It’s an unblinkingly cynical (yet, at the same time, oddly optimistic) panoramic view of America. As for my favorite film by an openly gay director, that would have to be “Safe” (1995) starring Julianne Moore (my favorite actress) as a wealthy woman who becomes allergic to her environment. A parable about AIDS in addition to being a cruelly effective horror film, it was early evidence that Todd Haynes was here to stay. Andrew Fleming’s “Threesome” with Lara Flynn Boyle and Josh Charles is a close second.

Do you listen to Music when you write, if so what?

I’m a music fanatic. It’s always been a secret dream of mine to be a rock star. So common, I know. I often have my television tuned to the ‘80s station when I’m working. I was born in 1976—this music was the wallpaper of my childhood. I’m fond of it for mainly sentimental reasons. Right now, I’m listening to Annie’s Lennox’s debut solo album, “Diva.”

Do you remember how you felt when you sold your first story?

You bet I do. I wrote my first short story in early 2004, just a month after being diagnosed with HIV. (Yes, I’m open about this. Feel free to print it.) I’d always fantasized about trying prose after spending my teens and 20s writing film and journalism, but my diagnosis put a finite end to my life as I knew it (at the risk of sounding maudlin), so I decided what the hell? I wrote a psychological horror story called “Nurse” and began sending it out. Eleven months later, it was picked up at a print horror venue called Wicked Hollow. I remember my then-boyfriend leading me by the hand through the gay bar in Longview, Texas, bragging that he was sleeping with a published author. I was na├»ve enough to find this touching. I still have the check for ten dollars that was my payment for the story.

What is your favorite quote?

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” Eleanor Roosevelt

If you could live anywhere in the world where would it be and why?

I’ve found inspiration in all the places I’ve lived, be it a small town in East Texas or the humid, sometimes horrifying greater Houston area. Since I write mainly in the realistic vein, setting is of immense importance to me. When you set a story at a party, for example, you must convince the reader that it’s an actual party and not a simple backdrop.

Where do you find inspiration?

Everywhere. I’ve noticed that all my “real” occupations involved me capitalizing on my people skills. These skills come in handy when writing fiction, too. I believe that unless you have a deep curiosity about people, you’ll likely never make it as a storyteller. Henry James once wrote that a writer is someone on whom nothing is lost. I couldn’t agree more. Especially since I write exclusively short fiction, I find inspiration in the tiniest details and moments of everyday life, things I suppose most people overlook entirely. It’s the job of the writer to illuminate what his readers may have overlooked.

When did you discover the need to write?

I admit, I first wrote because I loved the idea of placing my family and friends under my spell, so to speak. Perhaps my childhood stutter also played a part. When I suffered from that, writing a story was the only time I could finish a thought uninterrupted. Nowadays, I consider it my duty as a writer to speak for those who cannot or will not speak for themselves—whether it be a meth-addicted bathhouse groupie, unattractive gay man in a rural trailer park or reckless fag hag. There are so many people out there whose lives are never illuminated, I couldn’t explore them all were I given ten lifetimes.

How do you handle writers block?

I don’t really believe in writer’s block. If I come to an impasse during a first draft, I take it as a sign that I’ve made an error in constructing the narrative or one of the characters. When you’re really in the zone, the words can’t come fast enough. When your creative juice slows to a trickle, it’s often because your subconscious is trying to stop you from compounding a misstep you made earlier in the draft.

How can readers find you?
                                                                               
Fortunately, I have a very unusual last name. Just Googling “Thomas Kearnes” will take you to many pages of links leading you to my work that’s appeared in online venues. I’m also on Facebook and considering joining Twitter. I’m currently working on a website on Tumblr that will serve as a news source for my career events and other things (I enjoy writing film reviews as well). I plan to call it “Thomas Kearnes Is an Arrogant Jackass.” Look for it soon.

BBQ? Carolina, Tennessee, Texas or Kansas City?

I have no idea what this question is asking. I’m not a fan of barbecue sauce but eat just about any dead animal that comes my way. And I’m a lifelong Texan, so why not answer “Texas?”

Friday, August 2, 2013

New Release: Pretend I'm Not Here

Pretend I'm Not Here
Author: Thomas Kearnes
$4.99

Not every gay story is glamorous...

Not every gay story is glamorous. Or ends happily. Culled from queer publications like Educe Journal and Wilde Oats as well as mainstream publications like Word Riot and Eclectica, this collection traces the contemporary lives of gay men in rural East Texas


Available Now!

Friday, July 26, 2013

Available Now: Winner Takes All

Winner Takes All

Author: Jenny Urban & Elizabeth Silver

$3.99

No matter who wins, there will be no going back.

Dominic Taylor and Matt Harris have been friendly rivals – with occasional benefits – for a few years. With the downturn in the economy, though, Matt’s business is struggling. Dom, whose company is doing well, offers Matt a bet that could help save Matt’s company. But the terms of the bet would literally put Matt’s ass on the line and change the dynamic of their friendship.

As the deadline approaches, they graduate from making out to making love, raising the stakes as they must each come to terms with what they really want, and what really matters. But if the bet goes wrong or the deal goes south, no one will come out the winner.

Available Now!

Friday, July 5, 2013

New Release: A Place to Call Their Own by L. Dean Pace-Frech


A Place to Call Their Own

Author: L. Dean Pace-Frech

$3.99

Is it possible for two Civil War veterans to find their place in the world on the Kansas Prairie?

When the War Between the States ended in 1865 many Americans emerged from the turmoil energized by their possibilities for the future. Frank Greerson and Gregory Young were no different. After battling southern rebels and preserving the Union, the two men set out to battle the Kansas Prairie and build a life together. Frank yearned for his own farm, away from his family—even at the risk of alienating them. Gregory, an only child, returned home to claim his inheritance to help finance their adventure out west.

Between the difficult work of establishing a farm on the unforgiving Kansas prairie, and the additional obstacles provided by the weather, Native Americans and wild animals, will their love and loyalty be enough to sustain them through the hardships?

Available now!